Sunday, May 1, 2011

How To Charge Apple Products with Incompitable USB-Chargers

Apple has made it so that their newest products only will accept to charge from Apples expendsive charges ONLY.  I don't want to pay a bunch for a charger from apple, so I found a very simple way to charge with a normal cheap USB charger.




First of, an iPod charges from USB. The USB-cable has 4 wires inside it, the Red and Black are for the 5 VDC power, and the Green and White are for the data signals.


The charging itself goes from the Red and Black pins, but the newer Apple products wont accept charging without signal from the Data-pins.















Apple chargers has this signal, but cheaper USB-chargers don't.


















Please note that this may not work 100%, so do it at own risk. If you waste any material, its your problem.

I took an old USB-cable with an Male and Female end. I cut the wires up, and sizzled the two Data wires together on the Female side. 










Then i pluged the modified USB-cable into the cheap USB-charger, and then the Apple-cable in that again, and it accepted and started charging.

































I think what happends in that the iPod itself sends power trought the data-pins, and it lures it to charge. 


I also got an video showing this.


Watch on Youtube





2 comments:

Anonymous said...

This really helped me out! Ive got a solar charger with usb and it refused to work until i did this hack. Everywhere else people only suggested expensive adapters or mods using resistors. Who knew it was this simple! Thank you tons!!!

Varun Reddy said...

Once you’ve got the right charger for your gadget of choice, the next consideration is the power source. While most sources provide sufficient power, some – like the USB port on a computer – won’t provide enough, even if you’re using the perfect Charger.Internally a charger is an amazingly compact switching power supply that efficiently converts line AC into 5 volt DC output. The input AC is first converted to high-voltage DC. The DC is chopped up tens of thousands of times a second and fed into a tiny flyback transformer.